Monthly Archives: September 2017

Put Your Foot Down and Drive: Troubled Kingdom ‘Has Second Thoughts’!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Economics, Law, Political Science

Emergency on Planet Earth: Mexico Earthquakes ‘Latest of Many’!

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Urban Life

Literally Hitler: World’s Cutest Country ‘Engulfed by #Nazi Tsunami’!

Leave a comment

Filed under Politics, Psychology

PakiBash, 2.0: How Postmodern Racism Enables Systemic Decay

The renaissance of racism was one topic that we at Mediolana did not except to be writing about in the late summer of 2017, but with the rise of authoritarian populism in both key developed economies and emerging markets – and a nod to the 16-bit cult video game PakiBash – it makes perfect sense to elucidate the mechanics of this phenomenon.

Contemporary postmodern racism – while certainly not excluding the possibility of physical violence – is a predominantly virtual beast. But it has far-reaching real-world consequences, including ’tilting’ elections, the dehumanisation of out-groups and – crucially – guaranteed decline. Here’s how it works:

  1. Activate ad campaigns. The media is critical in creating a fecund climate for postmodern racism. It does this by running increasingly shrill stories which make popular scapegoats synonymous with structural economic and social problems that they have little-to-no tenable causative connection with, especially vis-à-vis the rest of the population. Wildly inaccurate extrapolations from unrepresentative examples are routinely deployed in this phase.
  2. Increase the heat. The next step – in which the media often (though not always) plays the roles of both cheerleader and instigator – is to claim that in an era when hate speech has become the defining wallpaper of our digital culture, ‘ordinary people’ are somehow being silenced from expressing hate speech. This has the effect of getting people to adopt confrontational demeanours, raising the temperature far beyond rationality.
  3. Airbrush inconvenient facts. That EU migration constitutes a vast economic subsidy to, say, the finances of the United Kingdom – a net benefit of £8.8bn from 1995 to 2011, as opposed to a £604.5bn drain on the exchequer during the same period by British nationals – is something that must be flushed down the memory hole. Sexual abuse – something which numerous high-profile cases have demonstrated is tragically institutionalised at all levels of UK society – is, somehow, to be construed as solely committed by people with darker skin tones and ‘alien’ names working in the margins of the nighttime economy.

Postmodern racism is, in many senses, a quite brilliant stratagem. And to certain population demographics, this new and improved form of Paki-bashing will doubtless provide that surge of adrenalin which is otherwise presumed missing from their existences.

However, it does not actually solve any of the problems it purports to explain. Quite the reverse: (i) it infantilises sections of the general public by conning them into believing that their own deficiencies – such as catastrophically low levels of educational attainment – can be remedied by blaming abstract entities; (ii) it deliberately polarises and degrades political discourse; and (iii) it gives a Get Out of Jail Free card to the taxpayer-funded agencies whose performance and policies have been central in engendering systemic decay.

2 Comments

Filed under Culture, Media, Psychology

The Mother of All Fire Sales: ‘Magic’ Kingdom Privatising Everything!

Leave a comment

Filed under Economics, Education

That Incredible Shrinking Feeling: #Chinese Regiopolis ‘Experiencing Biological Leakage’!

Leave a comment

Filed under Environment, Urban Life

Buyer’s Remorse: Why Western Liberalism is in Serious Crisis

Since the tumultuous geopolitical events of 2016, analysts of all stripes have been struggling to come to terms with what appears to be a general and decisive shunning of Western liberalism. Those analysts who have ventured into explanatory territory have consistently cited reasons such as (i) the chasm between the super-rich and practically everyone else; (ii) the rise of the alt-right; and (iii) external interference in the smooth functioning of democratic procedure by ‘spoiler’ authoritarian states.

All of these rationales have their merits. But there is one other catalyst behind Western liberalism’s apparently sudden decline which virtually no one seems to have seriously raised, let alone expounded upon: the disenchantment engendered by political ‘products’ which desperately failed to live up to their sales pitches.

Rewind to 2008: the world is becoming engulfed in a financial crisis of gargantuan proportions; the wildly misnamed Operation Iraqi Freedom is on its way to accounting for the deaths of over one million people; and the American working and middle classes are starting to feel material squeezes of a kind not sensed since the Second World War. Barack Obama is not perceived so much as a solution to these intractable problems as a messiah: the man who is going to resurrect the United States economy, empower the disenfranchised demographics and bring about world peace. Yet after a solid eight years of Obamadom, systemic fiscal instability, unyielding militarisation and gross inequality were at least as bad as they were on 20th January 2009, when the indubitably iconic African-American first took office.

Aung San Suu Kyi is another exemplar of the same ilk. Consistently portrayed as a secular saint for decades, she became synonymous with the very concept of human rights. Yet in power, she has spectacularly – some would say, cynically – permitted a human rights catastrophe within her own jurisdiction.

When Nobel Peace Prize laureates promise salvation in opposition but deliver infernal outcomes once inaugurated, it should come as no real surprise that the general public is less than enchanted with a system that they perceive as fundamentally broken. The deeper tragedy is that Western liberal values risk being permanently degraded – not because they are necessarily thought of as exceptionable per se, but because their purported champions are viewed as essentially fraudulent.

2 Comments

Filed under Political Science, Politics