Category Archives: Marketing

The Big Reveal: Qatar Unveils 2022 FIFA World Cup Work of Art!

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Filed under Football, Marketing

Brand New Start: Big Apple Abolishes Alcohol Advertising! #NewYorkCity

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Filed under Environment, Marketing, Psychology, Urban Life

January Stars: New Year, New Legal Notice!

As the new year begins to find its own rhythm and the dates on the calendar begin to resemble something truly space age, we at Mediolana are relieved to announce that some things in this world stay reassuringly familiar – albeit with a twist. The new legal notice for 2019 combines our traditional mixture of Latin and katakana characters, but some of the content has markedly changed; what these non-cosmetic alterations represent will be made evident in the coming months. In the interim period, stay – as they say in the industry – tuned!

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Filed under Law, Marketing

Resurrecting Brand Anglican: Can Embracing Contemporary Media Save the Church of England? #COFE #FollowTheStar

With the Christmas period fast receding into the distance, it seems entirely apposite to glance back at one of the more intriguing pieces of marketing in the run-up to what has become arguably the greatest target date in the global economy: the Church of England’s 96-second video clip that was the centrepiece of its Follow the Star campaign (‘FTS’, ‘#FollowTheStar’).

According to Adrian Harris – the Head of Digital for the official denomination of state in the United Kingdom’s largest constituent nation – the core concept behind #FollowTheStar was to get more people to attend church. To this end, his organisation’s 2018 Christmas advert follows real-life parishioners in their preparations for and attendance at what one assumes is a semi-fictional Christmas service.

The commercial itself is not the worst out there, although like many of contemporary examples of the genre it suffers from a lack of investment in developing visually compelling characters with truly arresting personalities.

However – after some reflection – we at Mediolana can’t help but wonder if, perhaps somewhat counterintuitively, the basic logic of the ad is somewhat flawed. Understandably – in an era when attendances at Church of England venues are reaching unprecedented depths – the C of E is desperate to funnel warm bodies back into the pews; however, the depiction of a full church as displayed in the marketing spot is not just arguably a tad deceptive, but is setting up the viewer for a big disappointment should they ever follow through on their interest in the ‘service’ being proffered.

Instead, it could be posited that the Church of England should look at the problem from a near-opposite perspective and ask itself the basic question of why it is losing market share in the first place.

This is indubitably a vexed and complex issue, but one thing can be said for certain: any religious denomination whose teachings and general theological direction are virtually indistinguishable to that of mainstream opinion in what is easily one of the more secular societies anywhere on Earth is in serious danger of not differentiating itself enough to be relevant – or even basically interesting – to those of a spiritual bent.

This is a problem which even the tremendous resources and privileges that the Church of England enjoys for historical reasons cannot solve. And until this essential weakness is addressed, the curious spectacle of the established church in the home of the industrial revolution experiencing biological leakage to stronger ‘brands’ such as Buddhism, Islam, and other Christian denominations risks continuing unabated.

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Filed under Marketing, Spirituality

BRIC by BRIC: Emerging Markets Dominate #WorldCup Advertising!

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Filed under Economics, Marketing, Political Science

Resistance is Useless: Global Advertising Vortex ‘Drowning in New Subscribers’!

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Filed under Marketing, Psychology, Technology

The Shade of Her Parasol: Does Formula One’s Grid Girl Ban Risk Neo-Misogyny?

Regular readers of this blog will have long been aware that we at Mediolana are not an easily shocked bunch, but the news that Formula One (‘Formula 1’, ‘F1’) has abruptly terminated the presence of grid girls – promotional models who perform various logistical tasks, such as helping spectators with directions and holding umbrellas above stationary cars pre-race in the event of rain – at their events sent us into deep contemplation.

The grid girls ban –which comes into force with the start of the 2018 FIA Formula One World Championship on 25th March – comes hot on the heels of the Professional Darts Corporation’s abrogation of their utilisation of walk-on girls. But despite some apparent similarities, the two cases could scarcely be more different.

Not only are grid girls an F1 tradition which spans many decades – in contrast to their purported counterparts in darts, which are a recent innovation – but their aesthetic is a world away from the gaudy, tabloidesque presentation inflicted on females working in some other sports. Promotional models who work in Formula One convey a completely different brand proposition in which elegance and sophistication are richly in evidence. And while grid girl uniforms can vary somewhat in terms of quality, the general standard is very high indeed; some grand prix, notably those in Azerbaijan and China, have made wonderful use of local traditional fashion motifs to produce strikingly beautiful and iconic official clothing.

Moreover – and this is where it begins to get perplexing – in the context of the recent wave of sexual abuse scandals, the grid girl ban seems weirdly illogical. Most if not all promotional work undertaken by models on Formula One duty is in full public view, and nearly all said work is conducted in groups. Models who have worked in this sector aver that grid girl work is the one of the best gigs going: from the inside, there does not seem to be even a hint of complaint, let alone anything more sinister going on.

So why has this swift and unilateral commercial edict come to pass? Formula One itself claims that is has to do with ‘brand values’ and that the practice of grid girls ‘is at odds with [contemporary] societal norms’. On the latter point in particular they may be correct, and we respect the organisation’s reasoning. But the question must be asked: whose norms? Certainly not those of motor racing fans: a 12/2017 Internet poll conducted by BBC Sport found that 60% of F1 followers agreed that ‘grid girls should be part of Formula One’. And not those of the models involved, either; they are understandably furious that one of the most glamorous, interesting and lucrative professional opportunities in the field has been annulled, seemingly without so much as their being consulted.

Let us be clear: the norms which are being perpetuated by Formula One’s decision are those of the people cheering this move. These entities may be well-intentioned, but they are nevertheless spreading a perverse and soulless doctrine which results in the following:

  1. The deliberate erasure of beautiful women from public life;
  2. The de facto criminalisation of beautiful women; and
  3. The undermining of women’s rights through moral vacuity.

This last point is incredibly damaging. The ‘societal norms’ cited by Formula One are the same values which target utterly trivial matters with relentless crusades while letting gross and unforgivable abuses of women’s fundamental human rights – such as the right the life – go unchallenged indefinitely. ‘Societal norms’ which celebrate the absence of grid girls at, for example, the Mexican Grand Prix – and which are silent on the matter of narcocorridos which glorify the gruesome murder of women in that same country – are, to our mind at least, self-incriminating. They risk constituting nothing less than a form of neo-misogyny in which all women – and therefore society – are regarded as mere collateral damage.

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Filed under Marketing, Psychology